St. John's Marsh

Clay Township, MI

St. John’s Marsh

6200 Pte. Tremble Road
Clay Township, MI

Close
Get Directions
'; ';
Options hide options
Print Reset
Fetching directions...

St. John’s Marsh

Framing this block, is a border of half-square triangles. The center square is a scene of the marsh complete with wildlife native to this area.  Among the marsh reeds, cattails, and water lilies, you will find a great blue heron, a trumpeter swan, a large mouth bass, and even a muskrat, which is Algonac High School’s mascot.

St. John’s Marsh is located north of the North Channel of the St. Clair River, fronting on Lake St. Clair’s Bouvier Bay. The site offers a wildlife refuge areas as well as open and managed hunting zones.

St Johns Marsh was once called “Pointe Tremble Prairie.”  In the 1880s. Albert Miller envisioned the reclamation of 1.400 acres of marshland for agriculture. In 1882. two dredges worked in opposite directions to make a dyke around the entire tract. His plan was to be able to pump the water out and allow it back in as needed for irrigation. The plan was unsuccessful.

The State of Michigan bought the land and turned it into a state managed wildlife refuge.  Today, the State owns more than 3000 acres known as the St John’s Marsh.  Close to 160 different kinds of plants grow in St. John’s Wet Prairie Natural Area. These include many showy prairie wildflowers, such as blazing star and tall sunflower, and grasses, such as big blue stem and Indian grass. It is the home for many species such as turtles, deer, fox, ducks, geese, swans, egrets, herons.   The site has a gravel parking lot connected to the water trail, as well as a walking trail. The Marsh offers a wildlife refuge area as well as open and managed hunting zones. 

 

For more information, view Clay Township’s website:

https://www.claytownship.org/

Monument

At this site April 1977
The Michigan Dept. of Natural Resources purchased the first 45 acres of the St. John’s Marsh Project. The money was raised by the Lake St. Clair Advisory Committee and given to the state for the purchase.

Two time capsules were placed inside
Aug. 4, 2005.
In God we trust

Natural Beauty

It is the home for many species such as turtles, deer, fox, ducks, geese, swans, egrets, herons.   The site has a gravel parking lot connected to the water trail as well as a walking trail, offers a wildlife refuge area as well as open and managed hunting zones.

Recreation

Walking trails and a boat launch for canoeing and fishing make the marsh accessible to view the wild life.